Become An Owner Instead of a Worker


When we’re young, we trade our health for money.  We work long hours.  We lift heavy things and wear down our tendons. We spend hours typing or doing other repetitive motions that cause carpal tunnel syndrome.  We spend hours on our feet and wear down the disks in our backs and develop heel spurs.

We trade this wonderful gift of youth and health that we’ve been given, the ability to keep pushing it for may hours, to bounce back when we fall down and heal fast when we get cut, for cash by working way too many hours.  We go in before dawn and leave after dark, never getting out to see the sun and the woods and the oceans.  We work hard to go on a vacation, which is then rushed and filled with work thoughts and emails back to the office the whole time.  We buy large, beautiful homes that we spend all of our free time maintaining and cleaning when we aren’t working to pay the mortgage.  We buy things on credit and then spend a quarter to half of our time working to pay interest payments.

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While we’re young we can make extra money by just pushing it a little harder.  We can make that car payment if we work overtime on weekends so we can drive that shiny new car to work and have it sit in the parking lot all day, slowly decaying away.   We can take on that second job and get all of the cable packages and five different web streaming services.  We can keep buying clothes to impress people we don’t like and buying all of the latest gadgets to look good for people we don’t even know.

When we get old, we trade our money for health.  Any money we’ve saved up through those long hours of work goes to treatments, surgeries, and drugs to reduce the pain our weary bodies feel.  We spend money to try to have the ability to walk and run and jump and heal like we did so easily while we were young.  We get surgeries to be able to walk after long hours of carrying heavy loads have destroyed our knees.  We buy prescriptions to lower our blood pressure after years of sitting idle at a desk, eating poorly, and letting our health decay.

Stop.  Stop today.  Stop right this minute and change your life.

Become an owner instead of a worker.  Instead of getting that new car, drive your old one for a few more years and send those car payments you would have made into a stock mutual fund and become an owner in a group of companies.  Buy a smaller house for cash and invest the money you save on interest.  Stop buying things to impress people and just buy what you need so that you can spend time with your family who don’t care what the label on your blouse or jeans says.

Start building a portfolio so that you will be getting dividend payments and capital gains instead of paying interest payments and penalties.  Let others work for you so that you don’t need to work those extra hours.  Expand your lifestyle by waiting a little while to buy things, instead investing the money in mutual funds, then using the distributions from those mutual funds to add to your income.  Direct some of that money back into buy more mutual funds, and your income will expand on its own.

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Everybody can become an owner.  You can start a mutual fund account with Schwab for only $1.  You can start investing through Vanguard funds for only $3,000 ($1,000 if you start a retirement account).  Start an account and start sending a little of your paycheck in each month to build your wealth.  Own things.  Build things.  Stop just using all of your effort to generate entropy.  Stop having your money flow into your back account through direct deposit and then back out again to bills through auto pay without your even seeing it.

The next SmallIvy book, Cash Flow Your Way to Wealth, will be coming out in about a month.  It gives the game plan to go from worker to owner.  Subscribe to this blog to make sure you get your copy when the time comes and don’t miss out.

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Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning or tax advice.  It gives general information on investment strategy, picking stocks, and generally managing money to build wealth. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. Tax advice should be sought from a CPA.  All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.

Ten Bottles of Wine Made for $10


Are you a drinker?  Do you like a nice bottle of wine with a good meal, or perhaps a glass of wine in the afternoon while you sit and contemplate your day?  Maybe you like to have a few drinks with friends after work.

The issue with alcohol is that it’s expensive – ridiculously expensive.  If you’re trying to find money to fund a retirement fund, pay off student loans, or build up an emergency fund, paying for drinks makes that difficult.  A half-decent glass of wine can run you $9 or more at a bar nowadays.  A beer will cost $5 or more at a bar.  Even if you buy a bottle of wine and drink at home, you’ll pay $7 for the cheaper stuff and $15 or more  (lots more) for the better stuff.  Go out for a couple of drinks on Friday and Saturday nights, plus maybe a few during the week, and you’ll be spending more than $2500 per year on alcohol.  That’s enough to halfway fund an IRA and make yourself a millionaire by the time you’re sixty if you were to invest it religiously.

The Home Winemaker’s Companion: Secrets, Recipes, and Know-How for Making 115 Great-Tasting Wines

The thing is, alcohol itself really doesn’t cost that much to make.  It is the fact that the people who make the alcohol first get paid, then the distributor gets paid, then the grocery store or the bar gets paid that causes drinks to cost so much.  And if you’re buying drinks at a bar, you’re also paying the server in the form of a tip, which further adds to the cost.  Everyone who touches that bottle of beer or wine adds to the cost.

You can therefore greatly reduce the amount of money you spend on alcohol, yet still enjoy a drink with friends, if you make it yourself.  Unfortunately, you’ll still need to go to the bar or the liquor store for distilled drinks.  Those are tightly regulated since the government depends on the tax revenues from those. But you can still make beer or wine yourself, only paying the sales tax on the ingredients.

From what I understand, you can make some really great beer at home – far better than the industrial stuff you’re paying $5.00 each for at the bars.  I’ve never made beer, but understand it really isn’t all that hard and a great way to make some friends since there are a lot of passionate home brewers out there.  I’ve also sampled some of their products and it was as good as any microbrewery output I’ve tasted.

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I did get into making wine at home after we received a gift certificate for a wine class.  We thought we were going to make a wine at the shop which would then be stored/aged/ and fermented in a big barrel at the shop.  Instead, we were sent home with a couple of 1-gallon carboys, some brewers’ yeast, some yeast nutrient, and some pectin enzyme.   We were also given a recipe that used frozen grape juice as the base.

Can I make a cabernet rivaling those produced by Napa Valley?  No.  But I can produce a couple of gallons of wine better than your average $10 chardonnay or white table wine for about $1.00 per bottle. I also understand that you can buy wine kits in the $50 range that can since you can get grape juice from the same regions as the big winemakers, so you could probably make a good red wine, but you then would need large containers and also would need to have barrels to age the wine in.  I’m just not that into winemaking, but some people are.  If you were, I think you could probably make a bottle that would rival a $25 bottle you could find in the store for maybe $1.50 to $2.00 per bottle using one of the kits.

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Using the same two one-gallon carboys, I can make about 10 bottles of wine every two to three months.  (The amount of time depends on how warm the house is, since ambient temperature affects the fermentation rate and the wine taste.)  Many people upgrade to five to ten-gallon containers after they get started.  A five-gallon container would produce 25 bottles of wine every two to three months for about the same amount of work.  (You can legally make up to 100 gallons, or 500 bottles of wine per year per adult in your household in most states, which seems like a whole lot.  We drink maybe a couple of bottles a month, so there is no reason for us to “go big.”)

So, there is no reason to trade your future retirement for a few drinks today.  People pay way too much for alcohol, and there is no reason to do so.  It might be worth the inflated price of a drink to enjoy the nightlife at a club or two, but you may find that it is nice to have an evening in with friends and a bottle of your own wine or homebrew some weekends too.

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Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning advice, it gives information on a specific investment strategy and picking stocks. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.

The Biscuit Weave – A Cooking Failure


BiscuitPastrySometimes you get inspired in cooking and decide to try something new.  I had two kids to feed on a Saturday morning, various jams in the refrigerator, and decided to try something new – the biscuit weave. 

I thought that maybe I was onto something.  I had made bread weaves before, which turn out spectacular, but take a couple of days to do.  You need to make a sweet bread dough with milk, butter, yeast, flour, and some other ingredients.  Then you need to put it in the refrigerator overnight.  The next morning you then roll it out and form it as desired.  You can add butter, raisins, and cinnamon sugar and make some great cinnamon rolls this way.  You can make a jam braid where you put some preserves in the middle then criss-cross the dough over it in a weave.  When it bakes up, it is beautiful.

This morning I thought I had figured out a way to make a braid in just one morning – I would make the dough from biscuit dough, which does not need to rise or sit in the refrigerator overnight, then proceed the same way.  I pulled out my shortening and self-rising flour, and within about 10 minutes I had my biscuit dough ready.  I then pressed it out on a baking sheet, cut slits to criss-cross for the lattice, and spread a couple different kinds of jam into the middle.  I laced it up and it looked great.  I threw it into a 450 degree oven and set the timer for eight minutes – the time required to make biscuits.

When it came out it looked great.  The dough had puffed and risen and formed a great golden brown.  The jam leaked out a bit, but that was no big deal.  Just a bit of a mess to clean off of the cookie sheet.  But then I tried to cut it.


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The dough near the jam was raw.  It had cooked on the outside just fine, but the part touching the jam stayed too cool due to the jam, and due to being buried deep inside, and it didn’t cook.  With biscuits, you hit them with a lot of heat and they cook quickly.  But they can’t be too thick or the center will not cook before the outside burns. You also need to keep them fairly dry so that they get hot fast – water keeps the temperature to 212 degrees F until it evaporates.  I guess there is a reason you don’t see jelly-stuffed biscuits.

I put foil on the top and tried to bake it at 400 degrees a bit longer, but it really didn’t cook well.  After about 25 minutes, I pulled it out and tried to cut it.  It was truly a hot, sloppy mess.  You were able to eat most of it since much had cooked, but the part near the jam really wasn’t very pleasant.  The kids were troopers and ate my creation without complaint, but I could tell they would not want that meal again.  So, scratch that idea.

Sometimes things just don’t work out when you try something new.  But sometimes they work out great.  That’s part of the fun with cooking.  The other part is all of the money you save by not needing to pay $10 each for breakfast.

Questions?  Comments?  Let me know what’s on your mind by using the comment form below!

Follow on Twitter to get news about new articles. @SmallIvy_SI

Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning advice, it gives information on a specific investment strategy and picking stocks. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.