Are Your Parents Likely to Move In? If So, How Should You Prepare?


Don’t look now, but if your parents are in their late fifties or sixties, chances are pretty good that they’ll be moving back home – to your home – in ten to fifteen years.  They’ll still be healthy.  The issue will be that they’ll be out of money since many people in their late fifties and even early sixties have just a fraction of the amount of money needed to make it through a 20-30 year retirement.  Many just have enough to make it five years or less.

There are a couple of things you could do.  You could just ignore the issue and believe it won’t happen.  You could move away and leave no forwarding address, hoping to hide somewhere.  Or you could take on the issue head-on, figuring out if you are likely to need to take your parents in, perhaps help them take steps to delay the inevitable, and make choices now to be ready when the day arrives.  Here are some steps to take:

Have the talk

People say that the two conversations parents and children find most difficult are those about sex and money.  But if your parents are heading into retirement in the next ten or twenty years, now is the time to get a gage on how they are doing.  You may not be able to get them to talk about specific numbers, but maybe you can find out things like 1)Do they have a pension plan at work or a 401k?   2) If they have a 401k, have they been putting away 10% or more right along (if not, suggest they start putting away 15% now) 3)If they have they have a 401k, have they let it build up their whole career or have they pulled money out?  4)Are they planning to stay in their home in retirement or downsize and use the savings for living expenses?  5)Have they talked to a financial planner about their readiness for retirement?

Hopefully, they have a pension plan or they have been regularly contributing to their 401k with no withdrawals.  If they are planning to sell their home and downsize, they may be able to stretch their retirement savings a bit.  If they have gone to a financial planner, hopefully he/she has started to help them realize whether or not they have saved enough.  If from the answers to these questions it does not look like they have done much planning, brace yourself for the worst.  At the very least, see if you can set up a meeting with a financial planner to discuss their status and look at options.

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If you do get specific numbers, you can calculate the amount they have total in retirement accounts and other savings/investments (their net worth) to determine how much money they have available to generate income for retirement.  (Do not count their home value in the total unless they plan to sell.)  Once you have their net worth, subtract $400,000 for a couple or $250,000 for a single from the total to account for medical expenses in retirement, then divide by 25.  That is the yearly amount they’ll have available to withdraw each year to fund their retirement and probably make it through without running out-of-money.

For example, if they have $500,000 saved:

Yearly Amount = ($500,000 – $400,000)/25 = $4000/year

In the case above, they would be able to generate about $4,000 per year before starting to deplete their savings.  Add that to maybe $12,000 from Social Security, and they would have about $16,000 per year to spend.  That would not be a good lifestyle for most people and they would need help with bills and expenses.

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Set a Target

If you figure out that they need to be saving more, figure out how much they will need to pay for yearly expenses, and then figure out how much they need to save up to reach that target.  Assuming they’ll receive $12,000 per year from Social Security, here’s how much they would need to save up to generate different yearly income levels:

Monthly Income Yearly Income Single Account Value Couple Account Value
$2,500.00 $30,000 $700,000.00 $850,000.00
$3,333.33 $40,000 $950,000.00 $1,100,000.00
$4,166.67 $50,000 $1,200,000.00 $1,350,000.00
$5,000.00 $60,000 $1,450,000.00 $1,600,000.00
$5,833.33 $70,000 $1,700,000.00 $1,850,000.00
$6,666.67 $80,000 $1,950,000.00 $2,100,000.00
$7,500.00 $90,000 $2,200,000.00 $2,350,000.00
$8,333.33 $100,000 $2,450,000.00 $2,600,000.00

Realize that without the expenses of work clothes, maintaining a car for work, and things like professional dues and meals out, the amount needed in retirement will be less than their income while they are working.  If they pay off their home and cars, this will lower the amount needed even more.  They might therefore be able to set their retirement income target at 70% of their current take-home pay or so.  Of course, setting the target high reduces their risk in retirement.

Encourage them to save/invest if needed

If it looks like your parents aren’t ready, you’ll need to help them get into the best position they can.  Have them pull together a budget using the income you expect them to have in retirement if things don’t change.  Perhaps seeing what their life will be like if they head into retirement with $50,000 will cause them to decide to get passionate about saving.

You can then help them develop a savings plan to reach their goal.  If they are five years or less away from retirement, just subtract the amount they have from what they need, then divide by the number of years they have left until retirement to determine how much they need to put away per year.  Divide that number by 12 to determine how much they need to put away each month.

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 If they have more than five years until retirement, Multiply their monthly savings rate by the factor from the table below to estimate how much they’ll need to save each month since they’ll be able to invest to enhance their savings.

Years to Retirement Multiply Monthly Amount by
5 0.9
10 0.81
15 0.4
20 0.27

So, for example, if you calculate that they’ll need to raise about $2,000 per month to reach their goal and they have ten years until they will retire, they will actually only need to put away $2,000 x 0.81 = $1620 per month.  This assumes that they invest the money in a diversified set of stock and bond mutual funds or a target date fund appropriate for their retirement date.

Note that they will only need to save 27% as much if they start 20 years early – their investments will make up the rest.  If they are only five years away, they’ll need to raise about 90% of the difference through hard work and saving.  There is good reason to start saving early.  It may be too late for your parents, but you still have a chance.

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Encourage them to work longer

If they don’t have enough saved up and it is clear that they will not be able to do so before their expected retirement date, encourage them to think about working longer.  Not only will this allow them to pile up more money, but it will also reduce the number of years they’ll be drawing an income from their savings, reducing the amount they will need to have.  As long as they are healthy and don’t have enough saved up to live comfortably, they should continue to work, even if it is only part-time near the end.

New to investing? Want to learn how to use investing to supercharge your road to financial freedom?  Get the book: SmallIvy Book of Investing: Book1: Investing to Grow Wealthy

Have a question?  Please leave it in a comment.  Follow me on Twitter to get news about new articles and find out what I’m investing in. @SmallIvy_SI

Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning or tax advice.  It gives general information on investment strategy, picking stocks, and generally managing money to build wealth. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. Tax advice should be sought from a CPA.  All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.

Get Ready Millenials – Mom and Dad are Coming Home, to your Home


Hey millennials, glad that those in your generation, who came home after college and stayed another ten years, are finally getting their own place.  Sure, Mom and Dad are footing the down-payment, but at least you’re finally starting to venture out on your own like your parents probably did when they were 18 or maybe 21.  I’m sure that plenty of you also moved out and got a modest apartment when you graduated college or high school like your parents did – it is unfair to stereotype an entire generation – but there are more millennials living at home at age 28 than there were in any of the past generations, at least since about 1950.  There are also a lot of 30-somethings who still have their parents paying their phone bills or helping with other expenses, even when they are adult children living mainly on their own.

Many of us in GenX were worried about this development of delayed maturity.  The hashtag, #adulting, is truly assinine.  Note that Jack Daniels started his brewery at age 14, so it is possible to become self-sufficient and even do some pretty remarkable things way before you turn 25.  We wondered what would happen when your parent’s generation started to retire and people were needed to do all of the important jobs that they had done.  I’m sure your grandparents were also worried about who was going to pay for their Social Security if no one was working.  Also, what would happen if your generation never grew up and moved out before your parents retired or died and were no longer able to take care of you.  Solar Charger, 8000mAh 3-Port USB and 21LED Light Solar Power Bank Portable Battery Cellphone Charger, Solar Panel for Emergency Outdoor Camping Hiking for IOS and Android cellphones (Black)

But this morning I realized that we were worrying about the wrong people.  I’m sure that while 35 is the new 20, eventually those student loans will be paid off and you’ll be working your way up the corporate ladder.  I know that many of you are just waiting for your parent’s and grandparent’s generation to retire and get out-of-the-way so that you can advance.  I’ve also got to believe things like having kids will make you want to get your own space and a refrigerator on which to hang artworks from your elementary schoolers.

The real issue is your parent’s generation.  They don’t have anywhere near enough money to continue to live on their own all the way through a 30 or 40-year retirement that the are expecting to have.  To generate a $50,000 per-year income, which is probably about what it would take for them to continue to live in their home and continue to live about how they are now, they will need to save up about $1M by the time they retire.  Really they should have about $2M since there are also medical bills and a lot of retirees want to do some traveling when they retire.  The trouble is that the average person approaching retirement has about $135,000 saved up.  And that is the average, which includes some people who have several million saved tipping the scales.  There are a lot of people who have $50,000, or $20,000, or $2,000 saved beyond their home.

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In the past, many in their situation would have had the option of selling their home and moving somewhere cheaper.  If they were to move to a small apartment in a safe but unspectacular neighborhood, and not a condo on the beach or in a high-rise in downtown, that would help them get maybe a decade or more before they ran out of money. The issue is that a lot of them still don’t own their home.  They refinanced their mortgage and took out money to put you through college, or upgrade the kitchen, or pay off your student loans or credit card bills.  Many people bought bigger homes in their late forties or fifties and started all over again with a 30-year mortgage.  That means their home won’t be paid off until they’re 80, and they’ll only have maybe 20-30% equity when they hit retirement age since you pay mostly interest at the beginning of a loan.

So what happened with your parent’s generation that didn’t with your grandparent’s?  The issue is that your grandparents had a pension plan where their employer put money away for them and paid them less in salary.  Because they had a lower salary, they had smaller homes, took fewer vacations and cheaper vacations, and cook at home most meals.  Your grandmother is probably a much better cook than your mom, and that is because she has had 30 years of practice.  She didn’t do take-out unless it was a casserole she took to a church potluck.  Your grandparents also probably didn’t have two cars, the expense of two sets of work clothes, the daily lattes, and the cost of childcare.   They also had college tuition costs of about $3,000 per year in today’s dollars since they could not afford any more than that so universities kept frills to the minimum and didn’t ask for high tuitions.   In exchange for this more meager living, they had a pension plan waiting for them at retirement.

Your parents instead got higher salaries with the expectation that they would then save up for their own retirement.  This was actually a better deal since the returns on pension plan investments aren’t as great as returns one can get investing for oneself since the pension plan manager needs to be conservative (and get lower returns) all of the time to ensure there is enough money to keep the payments for current retirees flowing, but an individual can be aggressive during the first 30 years and then shift to a more conservative mix near the end.  The trouble is that your parents used the extra salary to buy bigger houses, take more lavish vacations, pay high college tuition costs and living costs for their college students, and eat every meal out.  Retirement was always something that they would worry about later when they didn’t have this need or that crisis to take care of.

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With $130,000 in savings, living in a standard home even without a mortgage, they’ll probably be able to eek out 5-7 years before they’ll run out of money.  This is assuming that they don’t have any major medical expenses, don’t travel the world, and that the stock market cooperates to a good extent.  A bear market, a mortgage payment, or a big medical bill could cause them to run out much sooner.  And what will happen then?

The most likely thing is for them to give you a call.  At that point you’ll be over at their place, having a big yard sale to sell off all of the stuff they’ve collected over the years (some of it will end up at your house), then they’ll be moving into that home office, guest bedroom, or workout studio you’ve made at your home.  Maybe you’ll still be living at your parents home, so you’ll just take over the mortgage payments and the grocery bills.BarksBar Original Pet Seat Cover for Cars – Black, WaterProof & Hammock Convertible (Standard, Black)

It will be nice to have them around to help out with watching the kids, assuming they’re interested in that.  But the house will suddenly feel a lot smaller, and there will be the inevitable power struggles and in-law struggles that come with multi-generation households.  Meals out will become a lot more expensive, as will vacation since you’ll be getting extra hotel rooms and tickets.  This is not a terrible arrangement, with many advantages such as your children getting to really know their grandparents, the ability to share some of the household chores (assuming your parents don’t decide it is your turn to take care of everything), and an easy transition when they become old enough to need a lot more help with things.  It is actually very common in Asian countries, especially in areas where housing prices are astronomical, and was the standard in the US for many families when most people were farmers.

Still, you had better start thinking in terms of how you will handle having a full household, both in managing expenses and living arrangements.  In the next post, I’ll go into some steps to take to get ready, starting with having a frank conversation with your parents about their finances.

New to investing? Want to learn how to use investing to supercharge your road to financial freedom?  Get the book: SmallIvy Book of Investing: Book1: Investing to Grow Wealthy

Have a question?  Please leave it in a comment.  Follow me on Twitter to get news about new articles and find out what I’m investing in. @SmallIvy_SI

Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning or tax advice.  It gives general information on investment strategy, picking stocks, and generally managing money to build wealth. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. Tax advice should be sought from a CPA.  All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.

The Small Investor Book Club Reviews Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing – Asset Allocation


For our second book club book,  I asked Small Investor readers to read The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing.  This was really a great book.  If you have not done so already, pick up a copy from Amazon using the link below – you’ll be glad you did.  For many people, the information within this book would be all they really needed to know to invest successfully.  It also has some great information about insurance and a little on money management.   I’ve made several posts about sections of this book since there is so much great information.
 

The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing

Today I would like to cover chapter eight, which is on Asset Allocation.  In addition to investing early and regularly and being aware of taxes and fees, asset allocation is key to maximizing your total investment returns.  There are two main reasons for asset allocation:  1) ensuring that you are invested in the areas of the market that are doing well at any given time and 2) reducing the level of fluctuations in your overall portfolio by buying assets that zig when the others zag, and thereby reducing the risk of a significant loss.

Asset Allocation for Improved Returns

If you have ever looked through your mutual fund statement, you may have noticed that some of your funds have performed much better than others during a given 1, 3, or 10-year period.  You may think to yourself, “I wish I had invested it all in that small-cap fund that made 20%, instead of havign some money in that large-cap fund that only made 8% over the last year.  In a worst-case scenario, you might decide to sell the shares of the large-cap fund and put it all into the small-cap.  Do this and you’ll be making 5% returns while the markets are making 12% returns.

The thing to realize is that you’ll never be able to predict which sectors of the markets are going to do well over any given period.  Efficient market theory says that all information that is known is already priced into the markets, so it is just as likely that the large-caps will do better than the small-caps over the next period as it is that the converse will occur.  By buying into both segments of the market, you’ll be sure to have some of your money in what is doing well next time.  While your whole portfolio will not be making as good a return as the best performing mutual fund in the mix, you’ll do better over time than you would if you were trying to jump from fund to fund and pick the one that will do well next.  The times that you pick the fund that makes 1% or declines while another one goes up 10% will more than offset any times you are lucky enough to actually pick the fund that makes 18% instead of 12%.

By moving into a fund that has done well, you are also buying shares that have already appreciated, meaning you are buying high.  While there is no reason that they cannot go higher for a period of time, which is why you should also not sell everything just because shares have gone up, on average shares that have been beaten down will do better than those that have shot up.  If anything, you’d do better buying the fund that did poorly since you’d be buying low instead of high.  Unfortunately, many people find the fund that has done the best during the last year and buy shares of that one, holding while it treads water or even declines, then sell just when they should be buying it because they are then trying to chase the next fund that did well.  It is better to invest in everything, then rebalance periodically to sell some of the shares in the funds that have done well and buy more of the shares in funds that have done less well.


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Asset Allocation Reduces Risk

A second reason to spread your money around is that it decreases the level of fluctuations in your overall portfolio, which means it reduces the amount of risk you are taking.  This risk includes not only the risk of losing money, but also the risk of not getting as good a return on your money as you should.  Different assets will do different things at any given time.  During the early 2000’s, you would want to be in stocks since they were increasing rapidly.  In 2008, you would want to be in bonds since they increased a little, plus paid interest, while a portfolio of all stocks declined by 40%.

When diversifying for stability, you want to pick assets that are as uncorrelated as possible, which means buying stocks, bonds, and real estate.  Stocks should also include companies of all sizes in both US and foreign markets, since sometimes the US is where to be and other times other countries do better.  Owning both a total US stock fund and a total foreign stock fund will cover all of the bases.  Bonds should be both US and foreign as well, and also have different maturity dates, ranging from short-term, which are safer but have lower returns, and long-term, which pay a better interest rate but fluctuate in price more.  You can get exposure to both of these markets with a total bond market fund.  Real estate should include your home, along with either rental properties or Real-Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) if you don’t want to be a landlord.  You could also throw things such as art or collectibles into the mix, but that really takes some knowledge (and some space), so that is better left as a hobby if that is what you like to do than as an asset allocation plan.

 

The Boglehead’s provide suggested asset allocations for people of different ages and risk tolerances at the end of Chapter 8.  They even provide suggestions of combinations of Vanguard funds that you could use, doing all of the work for you.  If you haven’t done so already, be sure to buy a copy of The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing.  Please also share your thoughts with the group when you’re done reading.

Follow me on Twitter to get news about new articles and find out what I’m investing in. @SmallIvy_SI

Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning or tax advice.  It gives general information on investment strategy, picking stocks, and generally managing money to build wealth. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. Tax advice should be sought from a CPA.  All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.