Feedback, Please!


Just a reminder – if you like the information you’re reading, please leave a comment and let me know.  You can also subscribe (see button at the right) where you’ll get an email of each post sent to you.  I don’t use this information in any way, and you can unsubscribe at any time.  By doing this, it lets me know that people are reading and interested, so it makes sense for me to continue.  If I’m not helping people, I’ll find other things to do.

Also, if you have questions or topics you’d like me to address in a future post, leave it in a comment and I’ll get to it.  If I’m boring you with some topics, let me know that too.  I’m trying to help both beginners and more seasoned investors, so use the categories to find the topics that interest you.

Finally, if you like the info and want to share the site with your friends, copy the link and email it to your friends:

http://smallivy.com

Best Regards,

Small Ivy

 

The Compound Effect

“No gimmicks. No Hyperbole. No Magic Bullet. The Compound Effect is based on the principle that decisions shape your destiny. Little, everyday decisions will either take you to the life you desire or to disaster by default. Darren Hardy, publisher of Success Magazine, presents The Compound Effect, a distillation of the fundamental principles that have guided the most phenomenal achievements in business, relationships, and beyond. This easy-to-use, step-by-step operating system allows you to multiply your success, chart your progress, and achieve any desire. If you’re serious about living an extraordinary life, use the power of The Compound Effect to create the success you want.”

Follow me on Twitter to get news about new articles and find out what I’m investing in. @SmallIvy_SI

Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning or tax advice.  It gives general information on investment strategy, picking stocks, and generally managing money to build wealth. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. Tax advice should be sought from a CPA.  All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.

How to Find Information on Individual Stocks


All right – so you know how to screen stocks, but where can you find information such as earnings?  The internet is obviously a wealth of information, but more and more of it is becoming a paid service.  Still, there is a lot of information out there for free.  Sites such as Yahoo give basic current stats, although I don’t know of any site that gives several quarters of earnings, P/E ratios, etc… any more.  You really need to be able to look back for several years to see how the company has grown and how it is priced currently relative to where it normally trades.

A great publication for the long-term investor is the Value Line Investment Survey (www.valueline.com).  I tend to use the print version, although there is an online version that I’m sure is also useful.  I like Value Line because it gives full-page descriptions on each stock including a price graph, stats going back several years, and  a review of the company.  It also screens stock, assigning a value for Timeliness, Safety, and Technical.  Here, buying stocks with a 1 of 2 for Timeliness and at least a 3 for safety would be recommended in general.  Value Line costs quite a bit (about $800 per year), but it is worth the price because one will make far more in investments than the subscription price for a moderate-sized portfolio.  For someone starting out, most libraries also have Value Line subscriptions.  Given that you’ll only need to research new stocks every few months at most, this would be a good way to go initially.

Value Line Select®: Dividend Income & Growth April 2017: Discover dividend-yielding stocks selected by Value Line analysts.

For getting investment ideas – which stocks at which to take a closer look, publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Barrons, Forbes, and Money can be useful.  You need to be careful though in that many stocks will jump in price just because they are recommended in one of these publications.  The price will normally fall back within a couple weeks after the jump, so perhaps a good strategy would be to wait a couple of weeks after the issue comes out before buying in.  The publications also periodically have articles on ways to invest, although I’d avoid taking anything you read by itself on faith.  It is better to read a lot, and then make your own decisions.

Another possibility is simply going to the websites for the companies and looking for annual reports and data they provide.  This, however, doesn’t give you the ability to screen several stocks, looking for the ones that stand out.  If you get a tip from a magazine, however, you can go to the company website and find annual reports to get more information.

Still time to get in on the Small Investor Book Club.  Just read this month’s selection – we’ll discuss in a few days:

The Compound Effect

 

Follow me on Twitter to get news about new articles and find out what I’m investing in. @SmallIvy_SI

Disclaimer: This blog is not meant to give financial planning or tax advice.  It gives general information on investment strategy, picking stocks, and generally managing money to build wealth. It is not a solicitation to buy or sell stocks or any security. Financial planning advice should be sought from a certified financial planner, which the author is not. Tax advice should be sought from a CPA.  All investments involve risk and the reader as urged to consider risks carefully and seek the advice of experts if needed before investing.

Addressing the Naysayers


There are two types of people–those who make excuses and those who become millionaires. It’s fine for people to choose to spend for the now instead of save for the future, but I’m tired of those who choose to do so then complain about those who choose to accumulate wealth.

The Surprise Millionaires

Large Quote or Title wo Picture (6)

I thought it might be a good time to take a pause in our Surprise Millionaire journey to100114-BG-online-ad-01 address some of the skepticism voiced by some readers regarding their ability to become Surprise Millionaires in their own right. These folks tend to point out the same recurring themes regarding the average Surprise Millionaires profiled in my blog. These objections can be lumped in to the following three statements which I will address below:

These Surprise Millionaire types find it easy to accumulate wealth because they are not currently married or never married.

False:     If you check out this blog or mybookyou will find that many of our Surprise Millionaires are married and have been married throughout their adult lives.  However, I believe there could be an argument made that the Surprise Millionaire’s spouse needs to be on board with the wealth accumulation journey and be of…

View original post 223 more words

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: